A Quiet Saturday

In General, Media by John2 Comments

Today was a very quiet day for me.  I stayed at home and did my usual Saturday weekend wash and computer housekeeping chores.  But the day didn’t go quite as planned when I got up.  When I checked my emails, I found the second one from Cakewalk this week announcing the release of Sonar 8.5 digital audio workstation (DAW), and urging me to upgrade.

I bought Sonar 5 Producer Edition fairly early in my retirement, thinking that it would be great for my music endeavours on the computer which began on my Amiga in 1990 with a Korg M1 and various music software in the following five years such as Dr T’s  programs, Bars & Pipes, Music X and other great programs.

I didn’t take to Sonar 5 at all, and the audio rarely worked for me.  The next year with optimism, I upgraded to Sonar 6, but it still did nothing for me, and rarely worked with any audible sound.  Another year later, Sonar 7 was announced, but I was very sceptical, and it took six months before I decided to upgrade.

To my surprise, and delight, the new version worked like a treat, and Sonar 7 became part of my musical arsenal.  Sonar 8 was even better.  Sonar became a major contributor to what I could do with music.

This week the Sonar 8.5 Producer Edition upgrade became available and I didn’t hestitate to upgrade once I saw and considered what it offered.

I bought the upgrade at about 1.15pm today, and then started the download at about 1.30pm.  The download of the 2Gb file didn’t finish until 7.50pm.

The installation took quite a while, and then I had to install the patch update.

It was a long day to upgrade to Sonar 8.5 Producer Edition.

Was it worth it?  All I can say is that I produced a short music track I played on my Korg OASYS keyboard and recorded in Sonar 8.5 and mastered in Sonar.

Here it is:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

and a bonus, also played on the Korg OASYS:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Comments

  1. Hey Man …

    I was sooooo keen to listen to your latest musical production that I just couldn’t accept “Error opening file” as a sad end to my night!

    I really enjoyed your talented keyboard track … matched with my satisfaction at playing internet detective and finding it to listen to on your WordPress pages.

    Please modify your XHTMTL code from:

    soundFile=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jthonline.com%2FWordPress%2Faudio%2F%20JTH%20First%20Sonar%208-51″

    to:

    soundFile=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jthonline.com%2FWordPress%2Faudio%2FJTH%20First%20Sonar%208-5.mp3″

    so that the whole connected world can share in the pleasure of it.

    Cheers, Reno

    1. Author

      You did very well there, Reno, to discover the name of the file and work out that the XHTML code would be :

      soundFile=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jthonline.com%2FWordPress%2Faudio%2FJTH%20First%20Sonar%208-5.mp3″

      However, WordPress is a PHP file and the HTML code I write is this simple:
      [audio:JTH First Sonar 8-5.mp3]

      The square brackets are part of the code, and in case you’re confused, HTML code can be written in a PHP file. PHP can be written in an HTML page, but the PHP code will not be executed unless the page is saved with a PHP extension.

      The blog page is typed in an editor much like any word processor. I only have to use HTML code to insert YouTube video and audio etc. YouTube provide the code (on the YouTube page note the little video image on the right of the page with two boxes under it – one with the URL and the other with the Embed code. You just click in the Embed box and do CTRL C to copy all the code. Then paste the code into the blog in its “HTML” view (which doesn’t show you any HTML code except what you type in as code).

      Anyway, the PHP file is sent to the PHP interpreter on my server which then works with the MySQL database and in the end the XHTML code is produced and sent to your browser when it requests the page.

Leave a Comment