Where Are We Now?

In General, Music, videoby John2 Comments

David Bowie (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947), the retired English musician and singer, turned 66 years old yesterday and released his first single in a decade.  Now I must confess that I’ve never been a fan of David Bowie, but this morning I was greeted with the news of his new single in all the online newspaper sites I looked at, and it was also featured in the TV news.  The following quote is from The Times in London:

“Had to get the train from Potsdamer Platz/You never knew I could do that/Just walking the dead,” comes the voice that, for those of a certain generation/persuasion, we will always attend to faithfully – like dogs with a silver dog-whistle.

In yesterday’s pre-dawn, David Bowie came out of retirement spectacularly. A surprise new single – Where Are We Now? – arrived overnight, like unexpected snow; accompanied by the news that it would be followed by an album, in March.

I listened to the recording online, and liked it so much I decided to create a post.  Here it is:

As I said I’ve never been a fan of David Bowie, and it didn’t help that when I bought my first VHS recorder in 1981, there were only a few VHS  tapes available for sale in Adelaide.   The Man Who Fell to Earth starring David Bowie was one of them, and in desperation I bought it.  I didn’t enjoy the movie at all, and considered it a waste of money.   However, recent years. I become quite fascinated with the TV series Life on Mars which featured the David Bowie’s recording as the soundtrack.  I grew to enjoy the recording.

 

Comments

  1. Hi John,

    There are some Bowie songs I have liked over the years, highlighted by the recently popular 1977 Christmas duet with Bing Crosby (The Little Drummer Boy / Peace on Earth).

    Can’t say I like either the new single or Life on Mars recordings but I know that there is a strange phenomenon that can occur with music or tunes associated with movies or TV series. I hated the intro song to the (then) Star Trek Enterprise series but just like my lack of enthusiasm with Star Trek Next Generation when it first aired … as my interest in the characters and storyline grew, so did the appeal of the associated music / songs.

    As I have never watched Life on Mars, I have nothing likeable to associate Bowie’s recording to curry favour with my tastes.

    Thanks for the recordings to perhaps replay enough times to maybe grow on me more than first impressions.

    Cheers, Ralph

    1. Author

      Hi Ralph,

      Thanks for taking the trouble to comment. You are actually ahead of me, as I have never liked any of David Bowie’s songs over the years, and am not familiar with his pairing with Bing Crosby for The Little Drummer Boy, even though it is possibly my favourite Christmas song.

      You wrote that you have never watched the Life on Mars BBC TV series (there is a US one as well), so you have nothing likeable to associate with Bowie’s recording. Who said the TV series was likeable? I didn’t.

      To be honest (bearing in mind that it won Emmy Awards as best drama series) I thought it was hard to watch, with no likeable characters, and the most muddled and confusing plot I’ve ever come across.

      Try this. The story starts in 2006 with Detective Chief Inspector Sam Tyler being involved in a car accident and losing consciousness. When he wakes up, he is in 1973 and Life on Mars is playing on his car radio (it was David Bowie’s hit that year). When he goes back to work, it’s all different. He has a lower rank and the police methods of the day are very different to 2006. It becomes even more complicated when things happen that make Sam wonder if he has actually gone back in time, or is in hospital in 2006 in a coma and it is all a dream in his coma. Or perhaps he’s dead, or mad.

      I didn’t watch the series because I liked or enjoyed it. I watched it to see where it would go. And the David Bowie song gradually grew on me as a reasonable song. Nothing special.

      Regards,
      John

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